CKD Syllabus

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All the aspects of the CKD syllabus fit together and complement each other. The movements learned in basics, patterns, combinations and defense drills can be directly applied to shield and focus mitt training and actual self-defense situations. This differs from other martial arts syllabuses, in which the low stances and rigid blocks and punches practiced in basics, contrasts with the higher stances and more fluid blocks and punches that need to be used in a real-life situation. There is no such conflict, or ‘negative transfer’ in CKD – the movements practiced in all aspects of the syllabus is applicable to a self-defense situation, a concept known as ‘positive transfer’.

The Warm-Up Protocol

The CKD stretch is based on yoga movements. The stretches are done slowly with deep breathing in a relaxed manner, thereby releasing any muscular tension and increasing flexibility. These controlled movements prevent the type of over-stretching injuries. An additional benefit of the yoga-based warm up is the relaxation and calming of the mind before training, similar to meditation.


The main difference between CKD and other martial arts and fitness program is in its biomechanics or principles of movement. Everything from the stances to the punches is done in a relaxed manner. The more natural, more relaxed, curved, rhythmic movements encourage flow from one technique to the other. This results in faster blocks, faster stance transitions and faster combinations, thereby increasing the speed and power of these techniques and reducing the stress on the body and mind.

Choi Kwang Do Patterns:

Choi Kwang Do patterns are a series of movements that are executed at a slow steady pace. This helps the students to focus and to condition their body. Many benefits can be obtained from performing patterns. Increased body awareness, energy and oxygen intake are some of these benefits. Choi Kwang Do patterns are also used to simulate real-life, practical self defense skills. Focusing on an imaginary attacker helps to increase the stimulation and brings fun into the execution of patterns.

Basic Foot Techniques: Biomechanical Application, utilizing sequential motion, the reverse wheel and axle principle, stretch reflex, and the principle of ply metrics and push off the powerful leg muscles to maximize force.



  • Punching, Kicking, Striking, Dodging and Blocking techniques
  • Choi Kwang Do patterns and speed drills
  • Defense drills with protective wear
  • Close range drills incorporating, grabs, restraints and throws
  • Shield & mitt drills to demonstrate accuracy and force